Last edited by Daishura
Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

3 edition of An account of the new invented Pennsylvanian fire-places found in the catalog.

An account of the new invented Pennsylvanian fire-places

Benjamin Franklin

An account of the new invented Pennsylvanian fire-places

wherein their construction and manner of operation is particularly explained; their advantages above every other method of warming rooms demonstrated; and all objections that have been raised against the use of them, answered and obviated. : With directions for putting them up, and for using them to the best advantage. : And a copper-plate, in which the several parts of the machine are exactly laid down, from a scale of equal parts.

by Benjamin Franklin

  • 131 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published by Printed and sold by B. Franklin. in Philadelphia .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Stoves, Wood,
  • Fireplaces

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesEarly American imprints -- no. 5395.
    ContributionsEvans, Lewis, 1700?-1756, ill., Turner, James, d. 1759, engraver.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination[2], 37, [3] p., [1] folded leaf of plates
    Number of Pages37
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14618136M

    items: graphite, colored pencil, ink, diazo print, photographic print, and film photonegative ; in folder(s) 89 x cm. or smaller. | Includes preliminary and. have been added pointing out that extracts of Franklin's "Account of the New Invented Pennsylvanian Fire-Places" were published in the American Magazine and Historical Chronicle (), the first significant work of his to appear in an American magazine. One final suggestion: it would have been valuable if the printing of items by.

    With the famous kite he flew during a thunderstorm in , Franklin demonstrated that lightning is an electrical discharge. He was the first to identify the Gulf Stream, studied the motion of storms, and developed a theory on population growth. He invented bifocals, the .   In , Benjamin Franklin published "An Account of the New Invented Pennsylvanian Fire-places," describing the iron fireplace insert, today called a Franklin stove, whose "Front Plate is arched on the underside, and ornamented with Foliages, &c.".

      Thankfully, professor Scott E. Fahlman of Carnegie Mellon invented the smiley-face emoticon in , giving us all a chance to add emotion to our emails, text messages and even entertainment blogs. 55 pages, [1] p., [1] folded leaf of plates: 18 cm (8vo) Translation of: Account of the new invented Pennsylvanian fire-places wherein their construction and manner of operation is particularly explained; their advantages above every other method of warming rooms demonstrated; and all objections that have been raised against the use of them, answered and obviated.


Share this book
You might also like
Educating emergent bilinguals

Educating emergent bilinguals

Metropolis and region

Metropolis and region

eye manifestations of internal diseases.

eye manifestations of internal diseases.

Paraguay

Paraguay

charge to keep

charge to keep

Road needs in North Lancashire

Road needs in North Lancashire

Vegetation ecology and population biology of Fritillaria meleagris L. at the Kungsängen Nature Reserve, eastern Sweden

Vegetation ecology and population biology of Fritillaria meleagris L. at the Kungsängen Nature Reserve, eastern Sweden

Through the looking-glass and what Alice found there

Through the looking-glass and what Alice found there

The effects of the squat jump exercise on the lateral stability of the knee joint

The effects of the squat jump exercise on the lateral stability of the knee joint

Wholeness

Wholeness

Religions public presence

Religions public presence

COMPLEX ADAPTIVE SYSTEMS

COMPLEX ADAPTIVE SYSTEMS

Missouris war

Missouris war

Parallel skiing

Parallel skiing

An account of the new invented Pennsylvanian fire-places by Benjamin Franklin Download PDF EPUB FB2

An account of the new invented Pennsylvanian fire-places [Franklin, Benjamin] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. An account of the new invented Pennsylvanian fire-places. An Account of the New Invented Pennsylvanian Fire-Places Paperback – January 1, by Benjamin FRANKLIN (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editionsAuthor: Benjamin FRANKLIN.

Get this from a library. An account of the new invented Pennsylvanian fire-places. [Benjamin Franklin; John Carter Brown Library. Associates.]. An Account Of the New-Invented Fire-Places. In these Northern Colonies the Inhabitants keep Fires to sit by, generally Seven Months in the Year; that is, from the Beginning of October to the End of April; and in some Winters near Eight Months, by taking in part of September and May.

Wood, our common Fewel, which within these Years might be had at every Man’s Door, must now be fetch’d. Franllin's New Invented Pennsylvanian Fireplaces Paperback – January 1, by Benjamin Franklin (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editionsAuthor: Benjamin Franklin.

An account of the new invented Pennsylvanian fire-places:: wherein their construction and manner of operation is particularly explained; their advantages above every other method of warming rooms demonstrated; and all objections that have been raised against the use of them, answered and obviated.

An account of the new invented Pennsylvanian fire-places: wherein their construction and manner of operation is particularly explained, their advantages above every other method of warming rooms demonstrated, and all objections that have been raised against the use of them, answered and obviated: with directions for putting them up, and for using them to the best advantage, and a copper.

An account of the new invented Pennsylvanian fire-places: [electronic resource]: wherein their construction and manner of operation is particularly explained; their advantages above every other method of warming rooms demonstrated; and all objections that have been raised against the use of them, answered and obviated.

Franklin's New-invented Pennsylvanian Fireplaces [Benjamim Franklin] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Franklin's New-invented Pennsylvanian FireplacesAuthor: Benjamim Franklin. This portrait, which depicts Franklin as a learned scientist and inventor, was one of his favorites.

Pictured on the left is the signal-bell apparatus Franklin devised to detect the presence of electrically-charged clouds. The bolt of lightning, seen through the open window, became an attribute. Chicago: Fireplace Institute,1st Printing stapled paper cover book, Very Good+, facsimile reprint of the 17 Title: Franklin's "New-Invented Pennsylvanian Fireplaces" (an account of the new invented Pennsylvanian Fire-Places by Benjamin Franklin).

Franklin demonstrated his new theory of positive and negative charges, suggested the electrical nature of lightning, and proposed a tall, grounded rod as a protection against lightning.

These experiments established Franklin's reputation as a scientist, and in he received the Copley Medal of the Royal Society for his contributions to the.

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Title ; An account of the new invented Pennsylvanian fire-places: wherein their construction and manner of operation is particularly explained, their advantages above every other method of warming rooms demonstrated, and all objections that have been raised against the use of them, answered and obviated: with directions for putting them up, and for using them to the best advantage, and a.

The Franklin stove is a metal-lined fireplace named after Benjamin Franklin, who invented it in It had a hollow baffle near the rear (to transfer more heat from the fire to a room's air) and relied on an "inverted siphon" to draw the fire's hot fumes around the baffle.

It was intended to produce more heat and less smoke than an ordinary open fireplace, but it achieved few sales until it. In Franklin wrote and published an essay on the stove, “An Account of the New Invented Pennsylvanian Fire-Places.” Philadelphia: Printed and Sold by Benjamin Franklin, (Courtesy of Rare Book and Special Collections Division of the Library of Congress).

An account of the new invented Pennsylvanian fire-places: wherein their construction and manner of operation is particularly explained: their advantages above every other method of warming rooms demonstrated: and all objections that have been raised against the use of them, answered and obviated: with directions for putting them up, and for using them to the best advantage: and a copper.

An Account of the New Invented Pennsylvanian Fire-Places, Benjamin Franklin, courtesy of Library Company of Philadelphia, photo by Peter HarholdtViews: K. Lewis Evans and his maps by Walter Klinefelter (Book) Lewis Evans' map of the Kentucky country, () Lewis Evans' contributions to early American geology, by George W White (Book) A map of the area in dispute.

An account of the new invented Pennsylvanian fire-places: wherein their construction and manner of operation is particularly explained ; their advantages above every other method of warming rooms demonstrated ; and all objections that have been raised against the use of them, answered and obviated.

An account of the new invented Pennsylvanian fire-places: wherein their construction and manner of operation is particularly explained; their advantages above every other method of warming rooms demonstrated; and all objections that have been raised against the use of them, answered and obviated.(7) Illustration of the parts of a “Franklin Stove” in “An Account of the New Invented Pennsylvanian Fire-Places,” artist/author: Benjamin Franklin (), from the Library Company of Philadelphia.(8) Second Philadelphia lottery ticket, printed by Franklin in for the Association for Defense, to raise money for strengthening the city’s defenses, from the Rosenbach Museum.An / Account / Of the New Invented / Pennsylvanian / Fire-Places: [ Wherein/Their Construction and Manner of/Operation is particularly explained; heir Advantages above every other/Method of Warming Rooms de-/monstrated;/And all Objections that have been raised against / .